• Marco Workshop featuredimage 640x480

    The Tenth Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop

    Sunday, July 27, 2014

    The Tenth Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop will be held Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6-7, at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. This year’s workshop is organized by Professor…

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  • The 2014 Marco Graduate Fellows Evening

    Friday, June 6, 2014

    On April 25th, the Marco Institute hosted its annual Graduate Fellows evening to celebrate the 2013 Haslam Dissertation Fellowship recipient Katie Hodges-Kluck and the 2013 Anne Marie Van…

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  • Figure 6

    The den of Abra[h]am.

    Tuesday, February 11, 2014

    A colleague of mine informed me in late November that the Jewish community of Palermo was observing Hanukkah together for the first time in over 500 years since…

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  • il_mostro_nell__armadio__the_monster_in_the_closet__by_aurastella-d50vg5a

    “Outing” Plan B

    Monday, May 6, 2013

    You know you’ve thought about it. You don’t want to, but you do. But each day as you tenderly polish the prose and craft the structure of your…

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    Puritan astronomy? Increase Mather’s Kometogra...

    Wednesday, February 20, 2013

    In my last blog post for The Cohort, I talked about a peculiar example of historical chronology—a domestic manuscript from the late 17th century written by a teenaged…

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  • 2_crop_640x420_800px-mediterranean_sea_political_map-en-svg_

    Mediterranean History as a Medieval Panacea, or,...

    Monday, November 26, 2012

    This is perhaps something that should be prefaced by saying that I aspire to be a medieval Mediterranean historian, so this critique is more from the inside than…

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  • Newberry Library Case MS F 02632.126

    In Defense of the Edition

    Wednesday, October 17, 2012

    Including my MA and PhD programs, I’ve been an English lit graduate student—an early modernist—for going on five years, and I’ve never met a peer who is working…

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    “HEY now hear:” Thomas Meyer’s Beowulf

    Wednesday, September 12, 2012

    Thomas Meyer’s Beowulf, like the eponymous hero (and the monstrous villain too, I suppose), is an unrelenting force of nature. The deceptively casual choice of “HEY now hear” in…

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Jul
27

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The Tenth Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop

Marco Workshop featuredimage 640x480

The Tenth Annual Marco Manuscript Workshop will be held Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6-7, at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. This year’s workshop is organized by Professor Thomas Burman (History) and Ph.D. candidates Scott Bevill and Teresa Hooper (English).

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Scott Bevill

Scott Bevill

R. Scott Bevill (English) is a PhD candidate in Anglo-Saxon and early modern literature. His research interests include paleography, antiquarianism, the Anglo-Saxon classroom, and medievalisms. His current research involves the wider implications of the 16th century antiquarian mood on early modern historiography, poetics, and politics.

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Jun
6

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The 2014 Marco Graduate Fellows Evening

On April 25th, the Marco Institute hosted its annual Graduate Fellows evening to celebrate the 2013 Haslam Dissertation Fellowship recipient Katie Hodges-Kluck and the 2013 Anne Marie Van Hook Travel Fellowship recipient Scott Bevill. We also took the opportunity to announce the 2014 recipients – Thomas Lecaque (Haslam Dissertation Fellow) and Katie Hodges-Kluck (Van Hook Travel Fellow). The evening featured 20 minute lectures by the two fellows and a following reception.

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Scott Bevill

Scott Bevill

R. Scott Bevill (English) is a PhD candidate in Anglo-Saxon and early modern literature. His research interests include paleography, antiquarianism, the Anglo-Saxon classroom, and medievalisms. His current research involves the wider implications of the 16th century antiquarian mood on early modern historiography, poetics, and politics.

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Feb
11

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The den of Abra[h]am.

Figure 6

A colleague of mine informed me in late November that the Jewish community of Palermo was observing Hanukkah together for the first time in over 500 years since the expulsion of Jews from Sicily in 1492.  So for those nights, I was invited as a friend to join a group of about thirty faithful and friends gathered in one of the former prison cells used during the Inquisition.  The barracks are recently restored and open to the public, and they form a later part of the fourteenth-century Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri complex. Lo Steri, as the palace is locally called, served as the baronial residence of the Chiaramonte family, which held considerable power in Palermo throughout the fourteenth century. The palace later fell into the hands of the Sant’Ufficio, or Roman Inquisition, which built several multi-storied barracks used between 1605 and 1782 for the containment, torture, and execution of perceived enemies of the Catholic Church. The selection of the ex-carcere for the celebration of Hanukkah in Palermo invited commemoration and reflection of and upon the trials of those victims, and in a city without a synagogue, this particular Hanukkah introduced members of a fragmented community to each other for the first time.

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Kristen Streahle

Kristen Streahle

Kristen is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Cornell University. Her dissertation, "Crafting Nobility in Trecento Palermo: The Painted Ceiling of the Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri," investigates the socio-political environment in which Manfredi III Chiaramonte commissioned the painted program in the 'sala magna' or grand salon of the Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri in Palermo, Sicily.

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Editor - Melissa Rack
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Online Editor - R. Scott Bevill

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