• Figure 6

    The den of Abra[h]am.

    A colleague of mine informed me in late November that the Jewish community of Palermo was observing Hanukkah together for the first time in over 500 years since the expulsion of Jews from Sicily in 1492.  So for those nights, I was invited as a friend to join a group of about thirty faithful and [...]

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    “Outing” Plan B

    You know you’ve thought about it. You don’t want to, but you do. But each day as you tenderly polish the prose and craft the structure of your beloved dissertation into a finely honed rhetorical machine, you ask yourself that pesky question. And you probably hate yourself for asking it. You talk to your colleagues [...]

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    Marco Graduate Student Spotlight: Meghan Holmes Worth

    Our Marco Graduate Student Spotlight this week is Meghan Holmes-Worth, a Ph.D. Candidate and specialist in Premodern Europe who works with Dr. Jay Rubenstein. Meghan is the 2012 recipient of the Claude Robertson Award for Outstanding Student in European History, and the 2011-2012 recipient of the Jimmy and Dee Haslam Dissertation Fellowship. I recently had [...]

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    Puritan astronomy? Increase Mather’s Kometographia (1683)

    In my last blog post for The Cohort, I talked about a peculiar example of historical chronology—a domestic manuscript from the late 17th century written by a teenaged boy—and I’m still interested in recovering more documents that can help us broaden and complicate the received narratives of early modern scholarly disciplinarity. ‘Weird histories,’ so to [...]

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    Marco Graduate Student Spotlight: Leah Giamalva

    Our mission statement here at The Cohort relates our desire to give graduate students a voice in the academic community. This month begins a series of interviews with Marco graduate students. We believe it is immensely productive to be aware of what types of projects our colleagues are working on, both for the purposes of [...]

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    Mediterranean History as a Medieval Panacea, or, the Difficulties of European-based Medieval World History

    This is perhaps something that should be prefaced by saying that I aspire to be a medieval Mediterranean historian, so this critique is more from the inside than the outside.  I was recently reading Olivia Remie Constable’s excellent Housing the Stranger in the Mediterranean World: Lodging, Trade, and Travel in Late Antiquity and the Middle [...]

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    In Defense of the Edition

    Including my MA and PhD programs, I’ve been an English lit graduate student—an early modernist—for going on five years, and I’ve never met a peer who is working on a scholarly edition as a dissertation project. I’m not saying that it never happens, especially among medievalists, but just that edition-dissertations seem to be unusually and [...]

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    “HEY now hear:” Thomas Meyer’s Beowulf

    Thomas Meyer’s Beowulf, like the eponymous hero (and the monstrous villain too, I suppose), is an unrelenting force of nature. The deceptively casual choice of “HEY now hear” in place of the ever-puzzling Hwæt grabbed my attention and didn’t ease up until “song / sung / sing/er’s/ saga / ended” nearly eighty pages later. By then, [...]

Who We Are

The Cohort is a collaborative blog run by graduate students of the Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Our intention is to give voice to the graduate student community by providing a forum for the discussion of current methodological, pedagogical and theoretical issues in our fields. As a part of the Marco community, we also hope this site will serve as a supplement to the symposia, workshops, seminars, language programs and other events here at Marco.

Additionally, we invite contributions to the site through book reviews and guest posts from both established scholars and graduate students outside the Marco community. Thank you for visiting, and we hope you join us in this ongoing discussion!

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Figure 6

The den of Abra[h]am.

A colleague of mine informed me in late November that the Jewish community of Palermo was observing Hanukkah together for the first time in over 500 years since the expulsion of Jews from Sicily in 1492.  So for those nights, I was invited as a friend to join a group of about thirty faithful and [...]

Door to St Martin de Cunhlat

Galen Broeker and the Problem of Cunhlat: Is Peter Bartholomew from the Livradois?

I left Auvergne long enough ago that I am now in the reflecting and annotating phase when it comes to those pictures (all of the pictures are finally on my computer; my output should increase).  I have all kinds of ideas how the various sites/sights and texts that I’ve seen could work in my dissertation, [...]

The Livradois

Galen Broeker and the Major Romanesque Churches of Auvergn

Admittedly, I have been a bad blogger and haven’t updated in far too long.  That being said, internet connections have not been as excellent as I had hoped, and combined with massive data loads of pictures… well, I’ll just try to make up for it. Auvergne was incredible.  Imposing mountains: Thick Forests: …in the middle [...]

La Chaise-Dieu

Galen Broeker In the Footsteps of Saint Gilles and Saint Robert

There is an awful lot I could be posting about tonight, but I’ve discovered that my internet connection here comes with a total data used limit, and I’m getting precariously close.  As a result, let’s return to yesterday, when I went to La Chaise Dieu. Robert of Turlande, founder of La Chaise Dieu, was born [...]

Galen Broeker: The Love Song of the Archives Departmentales de Puy-de-Dome

Let us go then, you and I,  When the evening is spread out against the sky  Like a parchment spread upon a table;  Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,  The muttering retreats  Of restless nights in volcanic mountains  And tumbled monasteries with scallop-shells:  Streets that follow like a Roman road  Of insidious intent  To [...]