About Us

Mission Statement

We are graduate students in early modern and medieval studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and we represent the Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. We recognize that our community possesses the potential to view current theoretical and methodological approaches to literature and history with an eye to both tradition and innovation. We look to the past through the lens of the future. We are committed to excellence and believe in the great potential and benefit of collaborative research to shape the horizon of academic scholarship in the humanities in new and exciting ways. We are particularly interested in the convergence of literature and history. Our desire is that this collaborative blog will provide a forum for the graduate student community where young scholars from a variety of disciplines can share research with their peers as well as established scholars. It is our hope that the facilitation of critical conversation will provide graduate students with interdisciplinary supplemental resources, feedback on their current research, and a space where their voice can be heard.

Editorial Staff

Melissa Rack

Editor: Melissa Rack (English)

Melissa is a PhD candidate in Early Modern Studies. Her research interests include New Formalism, late 16th century Humanism, the evolution of the Early Modern lyric, secular ethics, Early Modern poetics, Hellenistic and Late Augustan poetry, and genre studies. She is currently writing a dissertation that seeks to define the cultural and aesthetic project of neotericism in the early modern epyllia.

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Thomas Lecaque

Managing Editor: Thomas Lecaque (History)

Thomas is a PhD student specializing in Medieval Europe. His research interests include the Crusades and Crusader States, Occitanian literature, music and history, the cult of saints, the Peace of God, vernacular literature, and Latin-Greek-Syriac Christian relations. His current research focuses on the Toulousain experience in the First and Second Crusades and the socioreligious background to the founding of the County of Tripoli.

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Scott Bevill

Web Editor: R. Scott Bevill (English)

Scott is a PhD candidate in Anglo-Saxon literature. His research interests include paleography, antiquarianism, the Anglo-Saxon classroom, and medievalisms. His current research involves the wider implications of the 16th century antiquarian mood on early modern historiography, poetics, and politics.

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Scott Bevill

Scott Bevill

R. Scott Bevill (English) is a PhD candidate in Anglo-Saxon and early modern literature. His research interests include paleography, antiquarianism, the Anglo-Saxon classroom, and medievalisms. His current research involves the wider implications of the 16th century antiquarian mood on early modern historiography, poetics, and politics.

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Editorial Staff

Editor - Melissa Rack
Managing Editor - Thomas Lecaque
Online Editor - R. Scott Bevill

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